D&D 5e in Durham, NC

This page will develop once we’ve had time to determine what kind of campaign we have and what we are all about

Setting
The setting is the world of Toril, the Forgotten Realms. More precisely, the Eastern Heartlands around the Dales and the Moonsea. It gives us the flexibility of rural and urban locations, political conflict and struggle, and many geographic and setting related features: The Moonsea and Sea of Falling Stars (Pirates?), the Anauroch (the great desert, its history, and the ruins), the Elven Court, and Cormyr, as well as Shadowdale and the old wizard, Elminster, not to mention the ruins of Myth Drannor, Zhentil Keep, and the Citadel of the Raven, should a dungeon crawl become desirable.

Setting History
The year is 1499. The history of the setting should serve only as a backdrop, and won’t play real significantly into the events of the game. In general, I’ll preserve the character of the setting, and major historical events, but finer details about the setting may be subject to change or tweaking (basically, if you know more about the setting than I, please don’t correct my rendering of the Realms). The first key event that all PCs should have a vague notion about is The Time of Troubles. It happened roughly 100 years ago and would be from the age of most character’s grandparents (though some young elves may have been children during it).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_of_Troubles_(Forgotten_Realms)

The second event is a little more recent, The Spellplague. The Spellplague will have ended during all the PCs young adulthood or mid to late childhood.

http://forgottenrealms.wikia.com/wiki/Spellplague

One key component to get out of this is that Arcane spell casters live with a great deal of uncertainty around the reliability of magic, due to global (even universal) cataclysmic events within the last century that wreaked havoc on the world they thought they knew.

Character Creation -
Current characters all started at level 1 using the standard method, but the group has gained a few levels, and 1st level characters would be likely to experience a quick and sudden demise if brought in at this point. Therefore, new characters should use the following method.

First, build the character according to the Player’s Handbook (new options from Sword Coast Adventurers’ Guide are all acceptable) for Level 1: Custom Build option for stats (27 points), standard equipment for background and class, max hp for first level.

Second, write something short (bullet point, story, etc. not more than a couple pages) about the character’s life so far. Make sure to include a time they nearly died (and were saved by someone, just dumb luck, were captured instead, whatever). Help to give some life to your character.

Third, level the character up to 1 level lower than the party average (as of session 14 the average was 5th level). Starting equipment will be what the character had for first level, any non-consumable spell components costing less than 101 gp per spell, and magic items as follows:

Levels 1-5 – 1 consumable and 1 non-consumable magic item – common to uncommon
Levels 6-11 – as levels 1-4, plus 1 consumable and 1 non consumable magic item – up to rare.
Levels 12+ – as levels 6-11, plus select 1 additional magic time up to very rare, subject to GM approval.

This link will summary magic items organized by rarity:
http://media.wizards.com/2014/downloads/dnd/MagicItemsRarity_printerfriendly.pdf

After new characters have traveled with the group for a while, we can use some of the downtime to bring the new characters up to the groups experience and level. I feel there is importance in preserving the experience of a character living close to death, that is, after all, part of the adventuring lifestyle.

All that said, if there is a player with an interesting idea outside these guidelines or who has a strong preference for some other form of creation, I’m willing to consider it, but the balance of the game will have to be preserved.

Durham D&D